What is Dry Vapor Steam Cleaning Used For

Steam Cleaning

Is Dry Vapor Steam Good For My Cleaning Needs? A Guide

A low moisture steam cleaner might be your best investment for cleaning and sanitizing water-sensitive equipment, processing surfaces, and other industrial areas where water is prohibited, or chemical cleaning is preferred. Keeping your equipment clean ensures maximum efficiency and ensures the safety of your employees and customers. To get the greatest results, it’s crucial to pick the right-sized dry steam cleaner for your needs.

Consider these questions before purchasing or considering a specialty dry steam cleaner:

  • Will you use the steam cleaner in a commercial or industrial environment?
  • What equipment and soils will you be cleaning?

What is Vapor Steam Cleaning Used For?

Vapor steam cleaners have been used primarily for general cleaning and sanitizing hard surfaces without chemicals. Applications include kitchen and bathroom grout cleaning, restaurants, supermarkets, schools, hotels, apartment buildings, and private homes. In addition, property owners and municipalities frequently use vapor steam cleaners for gum removal. Using a vapor steam cleaner is environmentally friendly and highly effective, and it leaves behind an oil and grease-free surface. The technology has recently found its way into industrial applications. It is likely that a vapor steam cleaner purchased with the intent of using it for one application will soon be used for general cleaning all around the shop as they are great for cleaning up production machinery and many other applications.

Dry Vapor Steam Cleaning vs. Other Cleaning Solutions

When cleaning or sanitizing a facility or equipment where water needs to be minimized or avoided, and chemical cleaning is not preferred, steam is the perfect solution. Steam cleaning with a vapor steam cleaner is environmentally friendly, extremely effective, leaves no residue, and leaves a surface free of oil and grease. With vapor steam cleaners, surfaces without chemicals can be cleaned and sanitized, while other cleaning solutions that involve chemicals may be harmful to the environment.

How to Choose a Dry Vapor Steam Cleaner

High steam temperature – the higher the temperature at the boiler, the higher the discharge temperature. All vapor steam cleaners lose some temperature between the boiler and the nozzle. Hotter steam significantly increases cleaning effectiveness. Check out our Dry Steam Cleaning Buying Guide.

  • Stainless steel boiler – stainless steel resists corrosion and limits heat transfer to its environment.
  • Safety devices such as water level sensor, boiler thermostat, pressure switch, safety pressure valve, and de-aeration valve.
  • The ability to refill the vapor steam cleaner with water without waiting for the unit to cool down first. This feature can save up to 20 minutes on every refill.
  • Large water reservoir.
  • Steam volume control – uses only the amount of steam needed to do the job. Less steam enhances the vapor steam cleaner’s ability to maintain temperature.
  • Handling features such as wheels are large enough to make it easy to roll the vapor steam cleaner over rough surfaces or up and downstairs. A good sturdy handle helps here, too.
  • Accessories – does the manufacturer offer the accessories needed for all applications?
  • Warranty – look for a one-year warranty on the machine and a three-year warranty on the boiler.

Next Steps:

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Advantages of Clean-in-Place Conveyor Belt Cleaning

Conveyor Belt Cleaning

In every food and beverage company, production hygiene is paramount to ensure product safety. For this reason, all equipment that comes in contact with the food or beverage product must be adequately cleaned and sanitized, and operating in top working condition at all times. One area of particular focus and historically time-consuming to clean are conveyor belts.

What is Clean In Place (CIP)?

Like other specialty manufacturing, food production requires the highest level of hygiene during all instances of production. “Clean in place” (CIP) is cleaning or sanitation systems that are designed to clean without having to remove the underlying items, in this case, conveyor belts. CIP technology developed particularly for conveyor belt cleaning in food and pharmaceutical producing companies allows production to continue and reduces downtime and cleaning costs. Due to strict oversight, there is a need to ensure non-contamination when cleaning conveyor belts. Opting for the CIP is the best decision that guarantees profit by saving time and labor without compromising the safety and quality of all goods produced.

Advantages to Clean in Place Belt Cleaning Solutions

Speed and Efficiency

CIP systems help to immediately save time and labor costs, making it much faster than manual cleaning. It reduces the production downtime, increases production capacity translating into more products, sales, and profitability. One company even saved over $79K in indirect labor cost after installing clean in place conveyor belt systems on their lines.

Reliability

With CIP systems, the benefits of cleaning and sanitation are apparent. Continued testing for pathogens is always suggested, but CIP systems do tend to offer more reliability.

Safety

No doubt, safety is of top priority when it comes to food production. When CIP belt cleaning systems are in use, they can clean more efficiently than the human eye. Since 2011, the FSMA increased the need for cleaning equipment that typical hand cleaning cannot keep up with. It also can help reduce the tendency of accidents such as slipping and falling during cleaning.

Dry Steam and CIP – The Perfect Pair

When CIP belt cleaning systems are paired with dry steam, it produces a perfect cleaning duo. Dry steam is superheated steam with all the cleaning and sanitizing power of “Wet” steam, but only a 5% moisture content. It obliterates oils, soils, allergens, and more and leaves surfaces clean and dry.

CIP dry steam cleaning systems also reduce water consumption up to 98% vs. traditional wet cleaning systems. If the reduction in water consumption is a corporate initiative for your business, dry steam should be an immediate focus area.

THE FACTS ABOUT STEAM

Steam Cleaning

  • Thoroughly clean and sanitize conveyor belts without the use of chemical cleaners that could be toxic.
  • Dry steam at a temperature of about 290 °F cleans grime, oils, kills microbes on contact, and leaves the belt dried almost instantly.
  • Since little or no water is left after using dry steam, there’s little t worry about the growth of mold, bacteria, and other pathogens.
  • Use up to 98% less water than other cleaning systems.

The Bottom Line

Better cleaning in less time that delivers more profitability. CIP solutions for belt cleaning offer almost immediate ROI, with most having 100% ROI in months, not years. Not only is it evident that manual cleaning of conveyor belts is time-wasting, but it’s also less efficient and prone to cause mistakes that could ruin the integrity of your food or beverage product. To install CIP belt cleaning systems in your food or beverage processing plant to ensure top-notch safety and optimum quality of your products. Check out our clean-in-place belt cleaning systems.

Next Steps:

Check out our CIP belt cleaning solutions

Learn more about our dry steam cleaning solutions

See how our CIP Belt Cleaning Solutions helped one of our customers

Get tips on How to Clean Ready -to- Eat Snack Manufacturing Equipment

Food Safety: The FSMA And How Can Steam Help

Environmental pathogen control is a vital part of everyday safety and product quality management in food processing facilities. According to the CDC, about 48 million people in the U.S. (1 in 6) get sick, 128,000 are hospitalized, and 3,000 die each year from foodborne diseases. Most of these illnesses and deaths are preventable. How do you ask? Proper cleaning and sanitation programs, including strong sanitation standard operating procedures (SSOP).

The FSMA and Food Safety: Why Does It Matter?

Since the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) was signed into law on Jan. 4, 2011, it has provided specific oversight and application of cleaning and sanitation methods that have delivered better public health protection by strengthening the food safety system. What makes this so significant? Everyone has to eat, and as trends in U.S. consumer behaviors move towards more processed or partially processed foods, production must evolve with it. Before the food even reaches the store shelf or table, it will have been through many different productions, processing, and packaging systems, all that require specific cleaning and sanitation procedures.

The Seven Major Rules

Throughout many different points of the supply chain, the FSMA has seven major rules to ensure the safety of consumers:

DISCOVER RULE-FOLLOWING SOLUTIONS

Steam Cleaning

How Can Modern Cleaning Technologies Help You Achieve Optimal Safety?

Manufacturers and food producers are constantly looking for the latest technology to meet and exceed FSMA guidelines and requirements. One of the most innovative and disruptive technologies in the last decade introduces “dry” steam technology. Dry steam has been superheated to deliver the benefits of steam (removes oils, allergens, kills bacteria, etc.) but with only 5%-10% moisture content. It makes it ideal for cleaning production surfaces, especially in water-sensitive and “dry clean only” environments.

 

With dry vapor steam cleaning, you don’t need to use chemicals to clean equipment. Additionally, it leaves equipment dry and ready for immediate use because of the cleaning method’s low moisture content. Substances such as stubborn grease, oil, dirt, and other residues can be cleaned from all kinds of surfaces, even small holes and crevices, with only water and without any need for chemicals.

      •   Dry vapor steam dissolves oils, fats, sugars, oils, and more without harsh scrubbing.

In food and beverage processing facilities, dry vapor steam cleaning is a great solution to dissolve grease, oils, or other types of residues on stoves, hoods, burners, vents, and even ceilings. Steam is excellent for cleaning small parts, tubes, switches, sensors, moving parts, or areas that can’t be reached with wiping. Machines like our commercial vapor steam cleaner with vacuum make it easy to sanitize and clean at the same time.

      •   The steam process can sanitize machinery, conveyor belts, and packaging equipment while reducing changeover times, in some cases eliminating changeovers.

With dry vapor steam cleaning on conveyor belts, it’s not necessary to dismantle parts or, in some cases, even to stop production. Steam delivers amazing labor-saving technology by decreasing sanitation time and increasing productivity with faster changeovers. Learn more about our fixed brushless belt cleaning solutions.

Bottom line? Steam is the solution you’ve been looking for to use in your cleaning and sanitation procedures.

NEXT STEPS:

See all our Food & Beverage Processing Cleaning & Sanitation Equipment

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Read about How One Confectioner Saved Over $79K in Indirect Labor Costs with steam

 

Surface Disinfection: Alcohol-Based or Water-Based?

BIOSPRAY Surface Disinfectant

If there was one thing everyone was talking about in 2020, it was surface disinfection. From the moment the novel coronavirus made its first appearance, surface sanitizing was a top of mind for almost every industry. You may be shocked to hear that more than 600,000 bacteria live on one square inch of human skin[i]. For humans, most bacteria are harmless. But species that cause diseases, called pathogens, may be harmful or even fatal.

For the average consumer, any sanitizer they could get their hands on seemed sufficient to clean and disinfect. For others with specific applications, the need for an efficient, safe, and cost-effective way to keep employees and visitors safe requires specialized solutions. This may include being safe for food contact-surfaces, quick-drying due to sensitive electronics areas, or many other reasons.

While many conversations have shifted from surface sanitation and disinfection to air purification, the reality is that surface cleaning and disinfection is still crucial. Ongoing maintenance of healthy workplaces and production environments requires surface sanitation and disinfection solutions.

Most sanitizers fall into one of two categories: water-based or alcohol-based. Alcohol-based sanitizers and disinfectants work best in specific environments. High traffic locations, sensitive electronics, healthcare or critical care environments, and anywhere quick-drying action is required. Water-based sanitizers and disinfectants work best for general

disinfection needs when surfaces can remain wet for up to 10 minutes.

Water-Based Sanitizers

If your applications are less time-sensitive, then a more affordable water-based solution might be better suited. More often than not, water-based sanitizers have longer “kill” claim times and require surfaces to remain wet for extended periods.

In addition to the protection against disease, water-based sanitizers can offer many benefits to users, including safe for use on food contact surfaces, HVAC system components, etc. These disinfectants can also be applied using portable disinfectant sprayers or chemical fogging systems. Water-based sanitizers are perfect for location when dwell times can be longer.

When to Use Water-Base Sanitizers

Water-Based sanitizers are best for general surfaces and those environments where surfaces can remain wet. Refer to the product label for specific information on application rates and approved applications.

Alcohol-Based Sanitizers

There are a variety of alcohol-based sanitizers on the market today – and thanks to COVID-19, the number of products to choose from can be overwhelming.

Alcohol-based sanitizers and disinfectants are very potent and can quickly reduce the number of active microbes or viruses on a surface. They dry quickly, offer excellent sanitation and disinfection properties, and are generally safe on sensitive electronic surfaces like scales, machinery, computers, kiosks, and more. Also, high traffic areas that may require quick drying disinfectants like door handles, security panels, and more.

They have been used to clean and disinfect surfaces everywhere, from large, public office buildings to hospitals to restaurants. Alcohol-based disinfectants are also the product of choice within the healthcare, dental, veterinary, and ambulatory environments due to their high efficacy and quick-drying characteristics.

When to Use Alcohol-Base Sanitizers

Simply put, you can use alcohol-based sanitizers in virtually every setting. Organizations like the CDC, FDA, and WHO all encourage using alcohol-based sanitizers to clean all manner of surfaces. In fact, alcohol is still the most-used type of disinfectant in today’s hospitals.

If you’re going to use alcohol to clean your office or other space, it is essential to make sure you’re using a solution appropriate for the application. Refer to the product labels for specific application environments and rates. Food production environments should be careful to use products approved for use in food-contact environments. In contrast, healthcare environments should focus on disinfection efficacy. Office, educational, and other general settings can utilize a variety of choices in alcohol-based disinfectants.

This could all feel very intimidating, but luckily we have just the solution. Check out our Sanitation & Disinfection Buying Guide to find which one will be your perfect solution.

 

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[i] Science Clarified. “We Are Surrounded.” Scienceclarified.com. http://www.scienceclarified.com/scitech/Bacteria-and-Viruses/We-Are-Surrounded.html

The Final Step: Sanitizing In Food Manufacturing

In the food manufacturing industry, food safety and quality is everything. Not only is it part of good manufacturing practices (GMP), but it’s the law. Food and beverage plants work with countless ingredients that can cause public health hazards, from microorganisms hiding in ingredient materials to allergens that cross-contaminate products during packaging processes. Microorganisms and other bacteria can even degrade the shelf life of some foods, creating an inferior product that can hurt your company as a whole.

So how do you prevent cross-contamination and unsafe pathogens or undeclared allergens from entering your food? The final step – sanitation. Food must be produced under sanitary conditions in order to be safe, and manufacturers must ensure sanitation is carried out consistently & effectively.

Risks in Food Manufacturing

The USDA requires all food manufacturing plants to meet a certain standard of cleanliness, which includes proper hygiene and regular sanitizing. Of course, there is a good reason for these regulations: these plants are preparing food for millions of Americans, and one mistake can make many people sick.

Some of the most common risks in the food manufacturing industry (many of which can be prevented with proper sanitation) include the following

Foodborne Illness

Earlier in 2020, the CDC reported 101 cases of salmonella across 17 states. They determined that the cause was contaminated peaches, which had been sold to grocers across the nation.

Regrettably, this story is rather common across the industry and it demonstrates the far reach that a single plant’s sanitation habits can have. Because one packing plant in California failed to properly sanitize their facility, their product became contaminated, and people got sick.

Cross-Contamination

According to Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE), an estimated 32 million Americans have some sort of food allergy. These allergies range in type and severity, from a mild rash or itchiness to life-threatening anaphylaxis. Because of this, individuals with allergies must be very careful when choosing foods to buy from the local grocery store — and they need to know with certainty that the things they’re eating don’t contain the ingredient they’re allergic to.

Today’s food manufacturing facilities process thousands of products every day. Some plants process a variety of different foods, which means that it’s always possible for some cross-contamination between ingredients. However, it’s easy to avoid this risk with thorough and diligent sanitization practices and GMP’s.

Shelf Instability

Perishable foods like meats, produce, and dairy products already have a limited shelf life — but if they are contaminated by hidden microorganisms or other bacteria, they can become inedible even faster. This is a big problem for food manufacturers, as it can impact product quality and eventually degrade your brand value.

Food that goes bad on the shelf is more likely to contribute to foodborne illness — bringing us right back to our first and most common risk. Clearly, it is essential to maintain high cleaning and sanitation standards throughout any food manufacturing plant, and companies must hold sanitization as a top priority.

Cleaning vs. Sanitizing

The USDA considers proper cleaning and sanitization a prerequisite to the industry’s hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP). Without thorough and consistent cleaning and sanitation, a facility cannot provide safe products to the consumer. Both of these practices are essential — and contrary to what some believe, they are not interchangeable.

What is the difference between cleaning and sanitizing? “Cleaning” refers to the process of removing soil from a surface. This is necessary to have a clean work environment, which can help slow the spread of bacteria or even viruses (which is even more important in the post-COVID work environment.

However, while cleaning removes soils, it doesn’t remove what cannot be seen with the human eye — microorganisms – nor does it kill them. This is why facilities must also practice proper sanitizing. “Sanitizing” is the final step of any cleaning process, and it helps kill off any microorganisms that are still lingering on any surface.

If a food manufacturing plant wants to prevent contamination (and they all do), it is absolutely essential to practice effective sanitizing. This means sanitizing surfaces more often and having the right tools at your disposal for an efficient and complete sanitation process.

The Solution

Sanitation should always be the final step in your plant sanitizing procedure, but that doesn’t mean you can do it halfway. In fact, food manufacturing companies need to be more fastidious about sanitizing than ever before! They need to have the right tools to eliminate microorganisms — and that means embracing alcohol-based sanitizers.

Alcohol-based sanitizing solutions have antiseptic properties that kill germs quickly and more effectively than plain water or alcohol-free solutions. Using an alcohol sanitizer in your cleaning protocol is one of the best ways to ensure a bacteria-free surface.

Find Your Perfect Solution:

But, of course, you can’t simply pick up a bottle of alcohol sanitizer from the drug store. Cleaning Food and Beverage plants requires a more careful approach and specific products. Look for products that are EPA registered food contact sanitations sprays; these require no wiping to effectively sanitize surfaces. Not only will this guarantee that your sanitation is food safe, but it also will cut down your cleaning time, giving you a safe, dry, and sanitary surface faster than other brands. If you use a sanitization system that utilizes a food-safe, quick-drying solution, your sanitation routine can become a quick and painless process that you can easily do each day.

The food manufacturing industry has a great responsibility to provide safe food products to people all over this country. And if you work in one of these facilities, it is up to you to maintain a high standard of cleanliness and sanitation. Not only is the reputation of your brand at risk, but the health and safety of the people who eat your food — sometimes, their very lives — are in your hands.

But if you have the right tools and the right sanitizing solutions, you can ensure clean work stations and safe products every time.

 

 

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