Infographic-10 Tips to Help Prevent Dust Explosions

Dust explosions are a serious danger that facility managers must be aware of in many industries including power generation and food processing. Even powders like flour or sugar can become a hazard in certain environments. Download this infographic to learn 10 tips to help prevent dust explosions.

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Top HEPA Vacuum Product Features and Differences for Radioactive Waste Cleanup

There are some cleanup jobs at power plants that require more than a wet vacuum. Plant operators are well aware that radioactive and other types of hazardous waste require a certified industrial vacuum cleaner. For five years, that has been the modus operandi for radioactive waste management teams at the ill-fated Fukushima Power Plant. Recently, Japan announced the completion of radioactive waste cleanup at the plant. Whether it’s a huge catastrophe or a relatively smaller incident like the recent scare at a Idaho Falls Radioactive Waste Management Plant, your fleet of HEPA vacuums needs to be primed and ready.  

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The Importance of Duct Cleaning for Indoor Air Quality

This winter could break temperature and snowfall records across the country. For most of us, staying inside is the only defense. Avoiding the outdoors may keep us safe from dangerous weather, but we face another danger from the inside. The air quality inside a building begins to worsen when there are less fresh outdoor air and an increase in people and animals. Poor air quality is not only uncomfortable but can be bad for your health.

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HVAC System Repair and Maintenance Crucial after Hurricane Flooding  

For the first time in recorded history, the U.S. was slammed with back-to-back Category 4 hurricanes — Harvey and Irma — from the Atlantic. Many people in Texas and Florida continue to battle and hopefully recover from flooded streets, scattered debris, damaged homes, and inoperable buildings. The economic costs associated with this tag team of natural disasters in the U.S. are expected to be $290 billion.  

Mold and HVAC Systems

Part of that recovery process will be to assess the extent of the water damage. In the hot and humid climates of Texas and Florida mold growth is the biggest concern.

Mold and mildew pose real threats to flooded buildings. The stagnant standing water presents the perfect environment for bacteria growth, making any porous materials susceptible.

Typically, mold grows on floors and walls, but flooded HVAC systems can also pose a real health threat if mold is allowed to grow. Ductwork and insulation that has mold growth can pose a health threat to the entire building if the HVAC system is running because mold spores can be carried through ducts and distributed throughout the building.

HVAC System Cleaning

Proper cleaning of HVAC systems after a flood is imperative to the health of building occupants. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that you remove all flood-contaminated insulation and materials associated with the HVAC system and discard them.

Then you should clean the interior of the flooded system with a HEPA vacuum to remove the dirt and debris as well as microorganisms that typical industrial vacuums may not be able to pick up. After the HVAC system is cleaned it also needs to be thoroughly disinfected to prevent the growth of bacteria and microorganisms.

The aftermaths of Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma will likely be felt for years while communities work to clean up and rebuild their homes and businesses. Prioritizing HVAC system cleaning is imperative to protect the health of building occupants during this time. Using a good HEPA vacuum to get rid of spores and a mold controlling cleaner are good ways to stop bacteria from growing and recurring.

Check out these other resources for information on HVAC mold prevention and cleaning:

  1. Effective Industrial Mold Control: A Three Step Process
  2. Controlling Mold: An HVAC Professional’s Guide
  3. How to Rid Your AC of Mold
  4. Mold Clean Up After Floods
  5. How to Protect an HVAC Unit from Flood Water

OSHA To Enforce New Standard Next to Reduce Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica

Construction work has always posed a risk to employee health but exposure to dust from concrete and stone has such severe risks that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has passed a new mandate for employers. With the increase in instances of lung cancer, silicosis, kidney disease, and COPD on job sites due to prolonged exposure to respirable crystalline silica from concrete and stone, OSHA has issued a final rule that aims to protect workers and save employers money on healthcare costs. They will enforce this new standard on September 23, 2017.

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