The Importance of a Legionella Maintenance Program in Cooling Towers

Closed due to Legionella

Two recent events in Atlanta, Georgia, underscores the importance of following a maintenance program for cooling towers to prevent the development of Legionella.

The first outbreak of Legionella happened at the Sheraton Atlanta in July of 2019. Six months later, more than 50 claims filed against the hotel prompted the parent company to file a lawsuit in Fulton County Superior Court. Attorney Jeffrey Diamond said, “It’s a type of a lawsuit called declaratory judgment in which the parties to an insurance policy-the insureds and the insurance companies- are going to litigate whether or not there is coverage for the claims of the people who are alleged to have been injured by the Legionella outbreak.”

In early August of 2020, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) closed several of its building located in Atlanta because a team of inspectors discovered Legionella bacteria in the water system. The bacteria most likely grew during the extended Coronavirus pandemic lockdown.

The CDC issued a statement that read, “During the recent closures at our leased space in Atlanta, working through the General Services Administration (GSA), CDC directed the landlord to take protective actions. Despite their best efforts, CDC has been notified that Legionella, which can cause ‘Legionnaires’ Disease, is present in some water sources in the buildings.” Since discovering the bacteria, the CDC shut down the facilities until the remediation project concludes.

What is ‘Legionnaires’ Disease?

A group of research biologists found Legionella bacteria among many attendees at a 1976 convention held in Philadelphia. The bacteria collect to create ‘Legionnaires’ disease, which patients contract by breathing water vapors that contain the bacteria. People over the age of 50, especially those with underlying lung problems, are the most vulnerable to the disease. Severe symptoms include the inability to breathe correctly, with around 15 percent of cases resulting in death. Other symptoms of the disease are acute fatigue and a persistent cough.

Cooling Towers and ‘Legionnaires’ Disease

What is the direct connection between legionnaires’ disease and a cooling tower? The answer lies in understanding cooling towers, as well as cooling tower maintenance.

Cooling towers operate as a part of an HVAC or process cooling system, typically for industrial infrastructures. Considered cost-effective and energy-efficient cooling centers operate in buildings that include schools, hospitals, industrial plants, and office buildings. Because they hold large quantities of water, cooling towers can produce Legionella bacteria if the systems do not receive regularly scheduled maintenance and have ineffective water treatment programs.

Maintenance Tips to Prevent Legionella Growth in Cooling Towers

Because of the large size, cooling towers are considered difficult to clean. However, to prevent the outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease withing cooling towers, you should follow a few tips for cooling tower maintenance.

Conduct Monthly Inspections

Inspecting cooling towers at least once a month helps identify areas where scale, biofilm, and sediment buildup occur. These are hotspots for Legionella to flourish. During the warmer months of the year, consider changing to a bi-weekly schedule of cooling tower maintenance.

Clean Basin Surfaces

Cleaning the basin of a cooling tower eliminates the places where harmful bacteria grow. Although basin cleaning can be a part of the monthly maintenance schedule, preventing the growth of Legionella requires a thorough basin cleaning at least once every two weeks. Attaching a powerful water filter can prevent the development of harmful slime.

Treat the Water

Contracting with a certified water treatment company should keep the water flowing through a cooling tower in pristine condition. Treatments like biocides can prevent the production of dangerous Legionella bacteria. Look at a water treatment program as one part of your cooling tower maintenance program, not a strategy that you should depend on by itself to prevent the outbreak of ‘Legionnaires’ disease.

Proper Sump Water Temperature

The Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) provides several recommendations on how to prevent Legionnaires’ disease in cooling towers. Perhaps the most crucial advice is to keep the temperature of the sump water below 68 degrees Fahrenheit at all times.

Remove Stagnant Water

Stagnant water represents the ideal spot for bacteria, such as Legionella, to grow. By conducting dead leg and side-arm piping, you should eliminate stagnant water from a cooling tower.

Reduce the Drift Rate

A contaminated mist that forms within a cooling tower can enter the respiratory system of anyone sitting or standing next to a cooling tower. Using a mist eliminator should be a priority on your cooling tower maintenance list.

Clean the Fill

Cleaning the fill not only eliminates scale and slime, but it also enhances the flow of water inside a cooling tower. Control the growth of mold and bacteria such as Legionella by cleaning a cooling tower fill at least once a month.

Disinfect the Surfaces

Once surfaces have been cleaned, consider disinfecting with an EPA registered antimicrobial product, labeled explicitly for HVAC use. This can help keep microorganisms from flourishing between cleaning cycles.

Two more tips to complete the list of tasks for cooling tower maintenance. First, always wear protective equipment when cleaning a system to prevent the breathing of harmful Legionella bacteria. Second, always keep records of completed maintenance on cooling towers.

The Bottom Line

The two outbreaks of Legionella bacteria emphasize the importance of implementing preventive maintenance techniques on water systems, especially the vital water system component called cooling towers. A cooling tower maintenance product like the CTV-1501 and BioSpray Tower can prevent Legionella bacteria from tarnishing your ‘company’s hard-earned positive reputation.

CTV-1501 Towervac® Cooling Tower Vacuum eliminates bacteria like Legionella. The powerful suction of the vacuum removes mud, slime, and algae, which are contaminants that allow Legionella to flourish. You do not have to drain the entire water system, which saves time and prevents water loss.

As a complementary tool to prevent the development of Legionella bacteria, the BioSpray Tower works well on non-porous surfaces. The disinfectant kills 99.9% of the Legionella that develops in cooling towers.

 

Next Steps:

Find your perfect solution with our Complete Cooling Tower Maintenance Solutions from Goodway

Learn about Cooling Tower Fill Descaling

Get tips on Preventing Health Risks from Contamination in Cooling Towers

 

 

The Importance of Air Quality in the Classroom

Classroom IAQ

Student filled hallways are right around the corner. Normally, this time of year means schoolyards filled with happy, playing kids, ready to begin a new school year with old friends and new…

But of course, we all know by now that 2020 is no normal year.

Instead of happy kids filing into the classroom, this year’s students are starting school with the lingering fear of COVID-19. Students, parents, and teachers are venturing into a unique educational experience, with distance learning and new classroom protocols changing everyone’s routine. And even these new protocols could change at any moment; earlier this month, a Georgia high school that had planned to proceed with in-person instruction was forced to close after students and staff tested positive for the coronavirus.

If your child’s school is currently teaching online, it may feel like this bizarre education system will never go away. Rest assured, things will return to normal – but when they do, we all will be a little more cautious about the world around us.

Hygiene tips like thorough hand washing and avoiding large groups are already becoming common knowledge, and (given that we all know the coronavirus can linger in the air) it’s only natural that air quality will become a greater cause for concern in the post-COVID world. Therefore, Facility managers of schools will need to start paying attention to the air quality in their schools.

Why Air Quality Matters

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has long been talking about the importance of indoor air quality, otherwise known as IAQ. Most of us spend much of our time indoors, be it at school, in the office, or in our own homes. While we may feel safe and comfortable in these spaces, they harbor an unfortunate secret: indoor air quality is over 2-5 times more polluted than the air outside!

When there are too many pollutants in an indoor space, people can experience adverse health effects. In fact, conditions like cough, eye irritation, and even Legionnaire’s disease can be attributed to poor air quality.

IAQ is particularly important in the classroom setting. Children spend an average of 1,000 hours in the classroom each year. In that time, they can breathe in a horrifying number of pollutants and volatile organic compounds. Air pollutants can trigger short-term health problems like headaches, coughs, and allergies, as well as chronic conditions like asthma, which affects 1 in 13 children today.

In addition to the health problems that come along with poor air quality, research shows that IAQ has a direct impact on our students’ academics. A 2015 Harvard study found that office workers scored higher on cognitive function tests when they were tested in environments with better IAQ. This study suggests that poor air quality is literally dampening our cognitive abilities! If you want students to perform at their very best, their classrooms absolutely must have clean air.

This body of evidence should be enough to convince everyone that IAQ is important, but the need becomes even more immediate when we factor in COVID-19. While the jury is still out on whether aerosol transmission (tiny particles of the virus that hang in the air after an infected person coughs, sneezes, or speaks) can cause a COVID-19 infection, it is clear that this form of transmission is something we should protect against. After all, countless other viruses – measles, influenza, and COVID-19’s cousin SARS – have been proven to spread through HVAC systems and indoor air. Protecting our students and school staff means making our indoor air quality a top priority.

If a classroom has good indoor air quality, the students will be less likely to get sick, more likely to be safe from COVID-19, and have greater cognitive function overall. The answer is clear: schools MUST work to improve their IAQ.

What Determines Your School’s Air Quality?

Before you can improve the air quality in your school or classroom, you have to understand the factors that contribute to poor air quality. There are some factors that aren’t easy to control, such as:

  • Outdoor pollution
  • Pet dander brought in by students/staff
  • Nanoparticles from shampoos, disinfectants, lotions, etc.

Unfortunately, it is nearly impossible to keep all pollutants out of your classroom. However, you can control the one factor that has the greatest impact on IAQ: your classroom’s ventilation.

Many classrooms today operate out of old buildings that allow for little air exchange with the outside world. As a result, the air in the classroom is poorly ventilated, allowing mold, mildew, and other nasty particles to grow throughout the ductwork. The best way to improve a classroom’s overall air quality is to clean out the ducts and maintain the building’s HVAC system, as this will keep the school nicely ventilated with clean air.

Improve IAQ in Your School

So, how do you go about cleaning a school’s air ducts? There are three main ways to sanitize your HVAC systems and get your vents looking like new.

1. Vacuum Your Ducts

Too often, dust and debris (such as particles from outside) settle in your air ducts, contaminating the air in your classroom forever after. The best way to get rid of these pollutants is with a good vacuuming. This process requires two types of vacuums:

  • A negative air machine, which cleans the ducts while preventing contamination of the space
  • A portable HEPA vacuum, which clean small surfaces like coils, drips pans, and other areas

Attach the negative air machine directly to your air duct and use it to remove the bulk of the dust from the duct. Then, clean up any residual debris with the HEPA vacuum. Just like that, your dust will be dust-free.

2. Kill Mold in the Venting System

If your HVAC system has mold or mildew, you may need a duct fogger to wipe out all that nasty growth. Foggers atomize a chemical (such as a mold control product) and spray it throughout your air ducts, allowing it to reach every corner and effectively kill any mold or mildew in your ductwork. Of course, if you do want to clean your classroom air ducts with a fogger, make sure you pick up a heavy-duty machine, like our AQ-FG Portable Chemical Fogger.

3. Use Safe Chemicals to Eliminate Contaminants

Once your air ducts are completely clean, you’ll want to make sure they stay that way. To do this, you’ll need to apply some chemicals that keep mildew, bacteria, and other microorganisms from growing.

According to the National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA), there are a variety of chemicals that can be used to clean HVAC systems. These include sanitizers, fungicides, and various detergents. However, it is important to remember that some people may be particularly sensitive to certain chemicals. If you’re using a chemical to clean your classroom, always check your chemical labels to ensure the product is safe for use around children. Like our BIOSPRAY-TOWER is an EPA registered disinfectant kills 99.9% of Legionella pneumophila and germs when correctly applied to hard, nonporous surfaces.

With the right tools and a little know-how, you can ensure that your classroom’s air ducts are clean and ready for your next class. And best of all, investing in your classroom air quality will ultimately help your students improve their health and their academic performance.

 

Next Steps:

Check out our AQ-FG Chemical Fogger

Complete Guide HVAC Maintenance Solutions

Check Your Basic Skills on Duct and Ventilation System Cleaning

Get some tips and tricks on Cleaning Ducts and Ventilation Systems

Indoor Air Quality Management In Hospitals Helps Prevent Infections

Hospitals are a unique environment for the spread of infectious diseases. COVID-19 aside, each year in the United States, healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) kill over 100,000 people annually. These healthcare-associated infections are considered errors in patient care and occur when a patient enters medical care for an ailment and becomes infected by a disease or virus unrelated to their original health issue. A comprehensive study completed by the Hospital Microbiome Project at the University of Chicago, Illinois, determined that healthcare-associated infections are most significantly caused by poor indoor air quality (IAQ). 

The climate of Health care facilities has been changed forever due to the current COVID-19 pandemic. It is more important than ever for health care facility management to fully understand their buildings IAQ and the effects it will have on their occupants. The use of highly efficient particle filtration in centralized HVAC systems reduces the airborne load of infectious particles (Azimi and Stephens 2013). According to ASHRAE  various strategies have been found to be effective at controlling transmission, including optimized airflow patterns, directional airflow, zone pressurization, dilution ventilation, in-room air-cleaning systems, general exhaust ventilation, personalized ventilation, local exhaust ventilation at the source, central system filtration, UVGI, and controlling indoor temperature and relative humidity. 

Contact Sanitation is an Incomplete Pathogen Eradication Method

Healthcare-associated infections occur in what the study describes as an environment of biological extremes. An environment of biological extremes does not occur naturally. Counterintuitively, it can exist in areas of limited physical space where there is a heightened state of virulence from anti-microbial medications and housekeeping disinfectants attempting to eradicate pathogens. 

Anti-microbial medications, sanitation equipment, and housekeeping disinfectants have historically been the common practice of hospital disinfectant programs, but in extreme cases, they can lead to stronger and more resistant pathogens that rapidly reproduce and thrive in the interior environment. There are often vulnerable patients inside hospitals with decreased immune defenses who are extremely susceptible to these pathogens. 

Contact sanitation, which is the use of anti-microbial medications, sterilizers, and disinfectants, targets the transmission of pathogens through contact and short distance interruption of large droplets. This sanitation strategy, however, does not interrupt all the means that pathogens have to spread throughout an interior space. 

Pathogens Can Spread Through the Interior Air

Pathogens can exist in droplet nuclei, which are aerosolized molecules less than five micrometers in diameter. Droplet nuclei can travel for extended periods through the air and are easily inhaled by patients or staff in a hospital.

Studies have shown that approximately 10 to 33 percent of all healthcare-associated infections travel through the air at some point between their initial source, the reservoir, and the eventual patient that they infect. Sanitation plans preventing pathogens spread through the air in medical facilities have historically not been as robust as contact sanitation plans. 

Using Indoor Air Quality Management to Prevent Infections

The study conducted by the Hospital Microbiome Project at the University of Chicago suggests that hospitals could target infectious disease spread economically and effectively by actively managing their interior air quality. 

As a result of the study, it was concluded that indoor relative humidity was the most statistically significant, independent variable affecting microbial spread throughout medical facilities. There was also a strong correlation detected between the presence of microbial communities and higher temperatures in rooms. The correlations between indoor air quality management and infectious disease spread are seasonal, and so air quality management becomes even more important during the winter months of a region. 

Relative humidity was the key air quality determinant in the study. The relative humidity is the amount of water vapor present in air expressed as a percentage of the amount needed for saturation at the same temperature. Proper employment of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems in medical facilities is the essential way to manage indoor air quality and maintain proper relative humidity levels.

The study by the Hospital Microbiome Project at the University of Chicago determined that a relative humidity below 40 percent was associated with an increased prevalence of healthcare-associated infections. The study suggested that maintaining indoor relative humidity between 40-60 percent relative humidity may be an effective and cost-efficient method of decreasing the spread of pathogens inside facilities.

The Responsibility is on Hospital Engineers and Facility Managers

The study completed by the Hospital Microbiome Project at the University of Chicago provides hospital engineers and facility managers with better data to guide their building management. Facility managers should create comprehensive plans to both monitors and maintain the indoor air quality in patient’s rooms and hospital interior areas. 

Maintaining relative humidity levels economically requires accurate monitoring capabilities and efficient HVAC systems in place to manage the large interior space inside hospitals. Hospitals often must invest in robust HVAC systems to meet the stringent demands of their air quality management plans. The best method of protecting these investments in HVAC equipment is to emplace comprehensive maintenance plans for the equipment. 

Maintenance Opportunities To Reduce Risks

Keeping Cooling Towers Clean is an effective way to provide quality IAQ by reducing the risk that outdoor air isn’t infected. Cooling towers that supply water for central air-conditioning systems, in general, are a common culprit for outbreaks of disease. These cooling towers can add to risks by emitting infected water vapor, which can be brought inside through fresh air ventilation points, and general entrances like windows, doors, etc. The best maintenance practices to prevent both viral and bacterial contamination inside cooling towers are aggressive cleaning plans paired with personnel training, monitoring, and testing. Our CTV-1501 TowerVac® Cooling Tower Vacuum safely removes solids from boiling tower basins common areas for bacteria, like Legionella and other micro-organisms, to flourish.

Cleaning and decontaminating ductwork is also a effective method for maintaining a healthy building. When evidence of microbial growth in your HVAC system or ductwork is present consider chemical antimicrobial solutions specially designed for HVAC systems.

There are also experts available and willing to help facility managers review their current maintenance plans or to create new plans altogether. As demonstrated by the Hospital Microbiome Project, indoor air quality is one of the most important building conditions to manage the spread of healthcare-associated infections. Facility managers and hospital engineers owe it to their patients to take an active role in maintaining indoor air quality and provide the safest environment possible to their patients. 

 

Next Steps:
The AHSE has put together a guide with tips on how to achieve proper IAQ and lower infections.

Read our Complete Guide HVAC Maintenance Solutions

Check Your Basic Skills on Duct and Ventilation System Cleaning

Learn about Duct Cleaning in Health Care Facilities 

Indoor Air Quality (IAQ): A Key Factor

 

Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) is a key factor in indoor environmental health. According to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the average American spends 93% of their life indoors. This time could be at work, at home, or anywhere in between. With that much time indoors people are susceptible to the effects of indoor air pollution. This is a wide definition that can run from airborne dust and allergens to bacterial problems, to VOC’s or chemicals in the air. Groups that typically are most in danger of poor IAQ are the young, the elderly, and the chronically ill suffering from respiratory or heart disease, but with that much stuff in the air, are any of us safe?. To improve indoor air, most HVAC  systems, when properly sized and maintained, are set up to avert illness by eliminating airborne microbial contaminants, mostly through effective filtering. When there is inadequate ventilation, improper humidity, and exposure to contaminant sources in a building, the health of the IAQ is compromised. As a business and facility building owner or manager, working to achieve a healthy building for occupants is essential.

As it relates to the current pandemic crisis, many are questioning what role HVAC systems and good IAQ have in our overall health. We can only look to the scientific community for answers. 

Epidemiological studies have shown that buildings previously occupied by individuals infected or colonized with MRSA, VRE, or Acinetobacter baumannii are at a significant risk of acquiring these organisms from previously contaminated environmental sites. (Dancer et al. 2006, Boyce et al. 1997, Huang et al. 2006, Denton et al. 2005)

Building factors or pollution in buildings that are most frequently associated with respiratory health effects include:

  • Presence of moisture, water damage, and microbiological pollutants.
  • Animal and other biological allergens
  • Combustion byproducts such as nitrogen dioxide.
  • Moisture or dirt in HVAC systems.
  • Low ventilation rates.
  • Formaldehyde.
  • Chemicals in cleaning products.
  • Outdoor pollutants or vehicle exhaust.

IAQ in your building

According to OSHA, when you have poor indoor air quality inside your home it can cause headaches, fatigue, concentration problems, skin rashes, and eye, nose, throat, lung irritation, and chronic health problems such as asthma. EPA states that your indoor air is likely 2 to 5 times more polluted than the air outside. To keep indoor air quality inside a building in top shape, is it important to control the building’s humidity. The EPA recommends a range of 30-50% humidity in your space. Bacteria and viruses thrive and circulate through poorly maintained building ventilation systems, as with Legionnaires’ disease. Damp, humid air can increase the survival rate of viruses indoors. While keeping humidity down helps slow the process of mold, proper ventilation helps keep the air floor uncontaminated. Using a system with filters can help remove biological contaminants. When air is stagnant air disease is more likely to spread.  The EPA has created a Building Air Quality Guide: A Guide for Building Owners and Facility Managers

With all the uncertainty of the current climate, it is important to take care of the things you can control, like your indoor air quality. Clean, maintained HVAC systems will help prevent the spread of many environmental health issues. To keep HVAC Systems healthy regular maintenance is essential. 

A good place to start to achieve a healthy environment at work and home is ASHRAE’s article on Good IAQ Practices. 

 

Next Steps:

Check your basic skills on duct and ventilation system cleaning

Read: Better HVAC IAQ with Copper?

Get some tips and tricks to cleaning ducts and ventilation systems

 

 

 

 

The Dangers In Your Cooling Tower

Foul Play? Cooling Tower Cleanliness Key to Plant Efficiency

What’s the Scoop on Viruses in Cooling Towers?

The current COVID19 pandemic has increased public visibility on infectious diseases throughout the world. Viruses like the novel coronavirus (aka COVID-19) that is currently impacting multiple nations worldwide comes with thousands of different characteristics that dictate their spread, survival rate, and degree of infection. With this particular virus, much is still unknown. 

Numerous viruses throughout history have shown the capability to survive in the water in cooling towers if untreated. The main factors that influence a virus’s survival in water include temperature, organic material in the water, and the presence of aerobic microorganisms. Of these factors, the most critical influence on any virus’s survival is temperature. Every virus has its survivable range, but generally, a virus’s survival rate decreases with increasing temperature. High heat (above 100C) causes the fast inactivation of most viruses. The survival potential of a virus decreases even further with the presence of predatory microorganisms, such as protozoa which increase the inactivation rate of viruses in water.

Currently, it is thought that the novel coronavirus causing outbreaks of COVID19 worldwide is a not significant risk of contaminating industrial cooling towers. But little e research has been completed to date. 

It may be worth noting, however, that when tested, the data has shown that most coronaviruses die off very rapidly in sewage wastewater, up to a 99.9% reduction of viral activity in water after two or three days of exposure. Viruses, however, adapt quickly to their environments as they spread across the world, and so facility managers need to continually update their maintenance plans to react to known global threats. 

Protecting and Maintaining Cooling Towers

A building may not be occupied at the moment, but regular maintenance must remain essential. Facility managers have a significant responsibility to mitigate and prevent the contamination of cooling towers from diseases. Although not much is know yet on the current COVID-19 virus threat to cooling towers, bacterial contamination poses an even more severe risk to cooling tower maintenance, Legionnaires disease. Legionnaires disease is a notable bacterial infection that can thrive in aquatic systems such as cooling towers used in industrial cooling systems, evaporative coolers, nebulizers, and hot water systems. Similar to viruses, bacteria like the legionella pneumophila can infect the lungs of people inhabiting and visiting buildings and facilities. 

Cooling towers that supply water for central air-conditioning systems, in general, are a common culprit for outbreaks of disease. These cooling towers spread recycled and fresh air throughout the interior climate of a building. The best maintenance practices to prevent both viral and bacterial contamination inside cooling towers are aggressive cleaning plans paired with personnel training, monitoring, and testing. 

The frequency and intensity of cooling tower cleaning should reflect the most recent government agency guidelines and the current local reports of contaminating risk levels. Frequent and lengthy scheduled cleaning of cooling towers will turn off critical building and operation equipment and will likely cause halts to facility operation. The risks to business operations need to be balanced with the current maintenance needs for facilities to ensure that business can continue while providing adequate maintenance for disease control. 

Facility managers can take numerous steps to mitigate the effects that increased cleaning plans and equipment downtime have on facility operations. These steps include tiered maintenance plans, where the facility shuts down only portions of cooling towers and related equipment at a time to maintain some level of operation while maintenance is cycled. Facility managers can also invest in the effectiveness and speed of their cleaning equipment. Smart investments in cleaning equipment can decrease the total downtime of equipment during cleaning. Goodway has numerous cleaning and maintenance solutions that facility managers can implement to reduce cleaning times while increasing effectiveness. Goodway’s cleaning solutions provide an economical and proven solution to preventing viral and bacterial build-up in cooling towers. 

The Dangers Of Ignoring Maintenance

Not correctly maintaining facility equipment, including cooling towers and water heating systems, can cost your thousands of dollars in repair and loss of efficient energy. But a danger much greater can be the fallout of a Legionella breakout. Take the mishandling of a Legionella breakout at an Illinois Veterans Home. After a year-long investigation of the break out that killed more than a dozen residents, Illinois paid nearly $6.4 Million to the families of the Veterans who lost their life to Legionella. General Frank Maution’s audit revealed the discharge of gallons of stagnant water when a hot-water heat was improperly returned to service that was previously offline. The leap that can be taken from a poorly maintained water tank to a cooling tower is not far apart. When water is left stagnant, a breeding ground for bacteria is created. Many buildings are unoccupied with non-essentials workers at home but make no mistake that regular maintenance is essential to keep buildings healthy for the return of occupancy.

Next Steps:

Research the complete line of Goodway’s Cooling Tower Cleaning Solutions to find the right solution for you.

Watch our webinar Preventative Maintenance for Cooling Tower Systems

Check out our 9 Tips To Controlling Legionella in Your Cooling Towers

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