Buying a Coil Cleaning System? Avoid these Five Mistakes

coil cleaning systemsSummer is coming, and with it a huge uptick in your facility’s HVAC usage. If your cooling systems aren’t properly serviced and maintained both your facility and your boss may be heating up fairly soon. Want to stay cool, optimize efficiency and still keep costs down? Avoid these five mistakes when buying an enterprise-grade coil cleaning system.

1 – Buying Same-Old System

As noted by AHCR News, coils have undergone significant evolution as companies look for ways to reduce refrigerant use without a loss of cooling power. Advances such as MicroGroove and micro channel technology, for example, leverage smaller-diameter copper tubes to carry less refrigerant at higher pressures. The result? Old cleaning tools may not have the ideal combination of pressure and flow to properly maintain new coils — for example, pump sprays may provide basic surface scrubbing but aren’t powerful enough to penetrate new coil beds. Bottom line? If you’re running new coils, you need new cleaning tools.

2 – Buying One-Size-Fits-All System

Another common mistake? Using generic tools rather than specific coil cleaning solutions. While “one size fits all” solutions may offer a quick clean they’re not designed for regularly scheduled, long-term cleaning. Look for industry-standard solutions — such as Goodway’s CoilPro line — which are tailored to meet specific cleaning needs.

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Coil Cleaner Market Trends: Mastering Preventive Maintenance Brings New Business

Dirt is a fact of life. Soil, pollen, dust and other debris conspire to make any HVAC installation less efficient over time; the nature of air and moisture transfer between condensing and evaporating systems make dirty coils an inevitable consequence of running HVAC. As noted by Contracting Business, however, a little dirt goes a long way when it comes to device operating costs and lifespans. What’s more, new markets are opening for companies able to guarantee clean coils and timely maintenance.

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Bed Bugs Take a Bite Out of the Big Apple

They’re baaaaack . . . 

It’s official: bed bugs have moved in and made themselves at home in the Pacific Investment Management Company’s (PIMCO) New York office.

Baby bedbugHundreds of employees have been evacuated from the building, with many worried they might carry the blood-sucking pests home to friends and family, according to Fox Business.

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Lights Out: Schools Under Threat From PCBs

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) aren’t good for humans. You probably guessed that by the name – they hardly sound like things you’d want to inhale or ingest.

iStock_000002424978SmallIn fact, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reports that PCBs cause cancer in animals and have a large number of toxic effects on humans including damage to the immune, nervous and endocrine systems along with reproductive issues.

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Cheap Natural Gas Fires Up Cogeneration Plant Proponents

In 2006, Koda Energy inked a deal with Minnesota company Rahr Malting Co. to build a power plant that not only generates electricity but captures waste heat created during the process and puts it to use.

iStock_000039111840SmallThese “cogeneration” plants aim for both environmental stewardship and fuel savings, which fluctuate with the price of natural gas.

When the plant got the green light, for example, the price of natural gas was $13 per one million BTU. By 2012, it bottomed out at $2. Is cheap natural gas the start of a slow decline for cogeneration?

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Up in Arms: Legionella Found in Unlikely Places

In 1976, Legionnaires at the Pennsylvania America Legion convention in Philadelphia started to get sick. At first, symptoms seemed identical to those of a typical pneumonia-based lung infection but the disease spread rapidly; over 200 people became ill and several died.

iStock_000043111880SmallThe outbreak prompted the discovery of Legionella, a water-loving and lung-hating bacteria. Mist from contaminated water – possible when showering, using hot tubs or even after prolonged exposure to air conditioning – causes this infection, which results in high fever, hacking cough and muscle aches.

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Clean Coal: Future or Fossil?

Our world has a coal problem. In the United States, coal-burning power plants are the largest source of air pollution, while in China some reports peg coal-based air pollution as the culprit for the deaths of more than 1.2 million people in 2010.

coal power plantBeijing has plans to impose low-sulphur coal policies across all industries next month, but this won’t cure the underlying problem: Massive carbon dioxide emissions.

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Top 10 HVAC Posts of All Time

Today we’re bringing you our Top 10 HVAC posts of all time. Drum roll, please.

Top Ten 1. Top 3 HVAC Expert Predictions for 2014
In this post, we talked to a few key experts in the HVAC field about their predictions for the upcoming year. It garnered lots of attention from our HVAC industry readers because it’s a good resource as they look ahead to the coming year.

2. How to Clean Your Heat Exchangers – Checklist Download
This post provides information on heat exchangers, including a link to a printable checklist that includes all the tools and products you need for the job. Our cleaning checklists are always popular as they’re great resources to put to use in everyday life.

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Summertime and the Bed Bugs Are Bitin’

Does just thinking about bed bugs make your skin crawl? Well, get ready because now that the hot weather is here, those little buggers are out in full force.

Baby bedbugFor example, late last week a New Hampshire summer camp shut down for the rest of the season because of a bed bug infestation in the boys’ cabins.

The camp will undergo extensive extermination treatment including the replacement of bed frames and mattresses, and a thorough steam cleaning of all surfaces.

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New Rules Harshly Affect Coal Industry

Late last year, we told you about the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) new carbon pollution standards and how they are expected to affect power plants.

Aerial of Power StationTo summarize, the EPA proposed standards in September 2013 intended to reduce carbon pollution for new power plants in an effort to fight climate change and improve public health. The proposal comes as part of President Barack Obama’s Climate Action Plan, which is focused on cutting carbon pollution.

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