The Important Role Preventive Maintenance Plays for Your Facility’s PTAC Units

PTAC Unit Preventive MaintenanceFor commercial and mixed use development projects, designing for heating and air conditioning systems requires finding simple, cost-effective systems that allow occupants to control spaces individually. The solution is often self-contained units such as packaged terminal air conditioning (PTAC) units. But without proper maintenance, these types of units can mean big problems when it comes to clean indoor air and energy costs.

Lack of Ventilation and Poor Insulation

Self contained units like PTAC units are great for apartments, hotels, retirement homes and spaces where individual units and individual spaces but these units often do not come with outdoor air intakes. Many of these units have poor drainage, constant usage or sub-par maintenance. As a result, PTAC units experience odor issues, dirt and dust problems and mold build up.

Additionally, because these types of units go through walls to the outside, they tend to transfer heat and cold through their metal frames from the outside to the inside, making it even more difficult to maintain inside temperatures and keep energy consumption down. Without the ability to cool effectively, moisture trapped inside the unit can create dangerous mold buildup.

Where It’s a Problem

One of the main reasons PTAC units  are widely used in hotels, hospitals, and facilities such as nursing homes is because they’re relatively low cost. In fact, they’re often up to 50% less expensive than traditional HVAC systems with ductwork. But what is gained in upfront cost can be lost in repairs and energy usage if units are not maintained properly.

The Solution

While some owners and facility managers may lean towards replacing these systems with other types, this is not always a viable option. Plus, with routine preventive maintenance, indoor air quality can be improved and energy costs lowered. For example, changing filters regularly, cleaning unit evaporators and condensers periodically. In addition, cleaning and protecting a PTAC unit’s coils against mold and mildew with an EPA registered mold inhibitor is also a good idea.

PTAC units may have issues with indoor air quality and energy efficiency but these issues can be alleviated with cleaning and regular maintenance. Owners and building managers of facilities where PTAC units are widely used should consider regular maintenance using a coil cleaner like Goodway Coilpro to clean coils and Coilshine detergent to prevent mold and mildew growth.

Next Steps

Check out these related Resources for PTAC maintenance and indoor air quality:

A Facility Manager’s Guide to Maintaining, Retrofitting and Replacing RTUs

As a facility manager, you’re likely aware the Department of Energy’s energy standards for rooftop units begin in 2018 and increase in 2023. But did you also know wasted energy can cost between $1,000 and $3,700 per unit if your facility’s RTU inventory (commercial air conditioners, heat pumps, and warm-air furnaces ) includes units that are over 10 years old, use R22 refrigerant, or have had little to no preventive maintenance? In other words, those old and inefficient RTUs are costing you and that doesn’t even include costly repairs and downtime.

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School Maintenance Managers Struggle to Eliminate a Four-Letter Word this Summer … Mold!

School maintenance managers won’t be taking much time off this summer as many struggle to keep up with swelling maintenance backlogs. How bad is it? According to a 2016 State of Facilities report, there are growing deferred maintenance backlogs in all types of schools across the United States and there’s no end in sight.

School Maintenance Manager Case for PMAlthough dealing with increasing costs because of this deferred maintenance is certainly a significant challenge, the bigger issues for educational facilities are ensuring good indoor air quality and the health and comfort of students.

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How Facility Technicians Can Prevent Evaporator Coil Corrosion Without Damaging AC Coils

It feels like summer has arrived in some regions and the last thing you want is your HVAC system to fail when a heat wave arrives. Detecting a drop in HVAC performance is often the only warning you’ll get that something is about to go wrong. But with dirty coils putting an unnecessary load on the system these warning signs can be hidden.

If you read our previous post, you already know that cleaning your facility’s HVAC coils can save up to 30% in power consumption, reduce wear and tear and improve IAQ by eliminating mold. But did you know that delaying the job can make the task harder and risk evaporator coil corrosion?

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How Proper Coil Cleaning Increases Savings, IAQ and System Efficiency

As things begin to heat up this summer, more and more HVAC facility managers and technicians will experience equipment and maintenance headaches. Take for example air conditioning systems. Even a well-maintained HVAC system consumes a lot of electricity, especially during the summer months.  In fact, air conditioning and other climate control technologies account for almost 25% of the power consumed in commercial properties in the United States. So consider how poorly your system will perform – and cost –  during the dog days of summer if it’s not properly maintained.

For one thing, it will need to work harder and stay on longer, thus consuming more electricity. Also consider that dirt and mold build-up on the evaporator coils will impact air quality and the health of your building’s occupants. If you ignore the problem long enough, you’ll spend a considerable amount of money to repair or replace the system. And your tenants won’t be too happy about the disruption.

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3 Ways to Ease Your HVAC Technician’s Spring Cleaning Budget and Burden

HVAC Maintenance Spring CleaningSpring cleaning isn’t your facility’s favorite time of year, but it needs to be done or those dirty coils and air ducts will lower efficiency and increase costs this summer. What’s more, uncleaned systems will diminish a facility’s indoor air quality. Why do HVAC technician’s delay this seasonal activity? Is it because cleaning your HVAC systems costs time and money, in terms of equipment, payroll hours and downtime? Or is it because you’re using the wrong tools and equipment? Identifying the right tools and equipment may the your answer.  These three spring cleaning alternatives are not only easy to use but are relatively quick and effective, saving you time and money.

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Why Removing Calcite (Limestone) from Landfill Leachate Systems’ Lines Require Specialized Descaling Chemicals

Calcite clogging is a major problem in the industry. This type of scale is typically associated with pipes, heat exchangers or other water handling equipment in general industry but it is also true that landfill channels can also become completely clogged with limescale. Typically the problem is ignored in landfills until it is too late and leachate channel systems become clogged resulting in back-ups of leachate flow. Ignoring the problem when signs of clogging are starting to happen only creates bigger headaches down the road. 

When it comes to cleaning calcite deposits in your leachate lines, there’s no better option than an industrial strength, specialized chemical descaler.  According to Goodway’s Director of Liquid Solutions, Ray Field, “It’s well documented that an inhibited acid descaler is the product of choice in these cases.” The main advantage to a chemical descaler is its ability to permeate throughout the entire leachate collection piping system. Alternatives like high-pressure water jetting may reach inside the first 75 feet of piping, but after that the scale down the channel is so deep that water jetting can’t get to the worst areas of scale. It then becomes a pervasive problem within the entire leachate network in the landfill.

Other alternatives include commodity acids — for example, commodity grade and concentrated sulfuric acid. But this can make a limescale headache even bigger. When adding sulfuric acid to calcite-clogged pipes, you’re going to end up turning your leachate lines into gypsum (or calcium sulfate). That’s a million times worse than even the worst limescale problem!

Power plants (and any associated landfills) provide an additional challenge. Each involve massive amounts of water. What’s more, they share a symbiotic relationship with regard to methane gas. Power plants pay landfills for their methane gas. When their leachate lines become clogged, methane metering from the landfill slowly chokes off — along with the amount of revenue going to the landfill from the power plant. That’s a direct result of letting calcium carbonate build up and going unchecked in a landfill leachate collection system. 

Certain chemical descalers are not only safe, but also dissolve mineral deposits extremely fast. For example, Goodway’s Scalebreak Liquid Descaler is biodegradable and dissolves calcium, lime, rust and other deposits from your systems. This particular descaler can be applied in a variety of environments that contain different materials, including steel, brass, copper, plastic and rubber. Thanks to Goodway’s customizable capabilities, Scalebreak products include special formulas specifically for stainless steel, maritime applications and potable water systems. Goodway also offers alkaline neutralizing crystals which allows lowering descaling acidity to meet your needs.

 Not only will specialized chemical descalers make systems operate more efficiently in the here and now, they will also increase the overall life of your systems with efficient and non-interrupted operation.

In the end, removing calcite from leachate lines requires customizable chemical liquid solutions for descaling — and maybe an aspirin or two if you’ve put it off for a while.

Next Steps:

Goodway’s Coverage of The AHR 2017 Expo

The AHR Expo is a massive trade show where every year, thousands of industry insiders, manufacturers and distributors converge on a Convention Center to show off the latest and greatest in the world of HVACR. This year’s Las Vegas event is particularly exciting, with new technologies such as split cassette systems from @Samsung, VRF systems and Internet of Things-enabled technologies promising to revolutionize the field.

Samsung’s development sparked interest due to its aesthetic appeal. The HVACR industry is starting to design its products not just from the perspective of what works best, but also what customers will want to look at, year in and year out. New VRF systems mean lower costs, but also less wear and tear on the system in general. @Rinnai America debuted a tankless system with 96 percent thermal efficiency. Some companies, such as @JohnsManville even used technology to display old wares, like their tower showing differences in sound attenuation.  

And, of course, there’s the Internet of Things. Smart thermostats are just the beginning. @BellGossett updated its intelligent pump and variable frequency drive. On-site setup and configuration is estimated to have been cut in half by this updated pump. @Victaulic debuted the world’s first grooved, installation-ready copper fittings. One subject that continues to be left out of the innovation conversation, however, is maintenance.

Maintenance is often an afterthought in the world of HVACR, despite the fact that companies might be losing hundreds of thousands or even millions of dollars in a year due to poorly running machines. Maintenance relates directly to efficiency and efficiency is synonymous with profitability in the field of HVACR. Take for example, microchannel coils. These coils are frequently cleaned using caustic hydroxides, which corrode and dissolve the aluminum within the coils. Improperly maintained machines means a shorter lifespan for basic equipment, higher cost of ownership and lower efficiency over the life of the cooler.

In fact, efficiency, tightly tied to maintenance is one of the strongest indicators of profitability. The investment, facility management and maintenance side of HVACR is aware of this. The manufacturing sector, however, seems less interested.

Goodway is proud to own innovation in the field of HVACR maintenance. We remain keyed into the industry, looking not only for new ways to clean equipment, but also constantly improving the mechanical and chemical solutions used. This means lower cost of ownership, less downtime and increased efficiency. Maintenance might not be the most exciting area of the HVACR world, but @GoodwayMachines is working hard ensuring maintenance doesn’t get left behind as HVACR becomes increasingly high tech.

No Te Olvides: Goodway at AHR Expo Mexico

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We came. We saw. We introduced over 10,879 HVAC&R industry professionals to some of the most advanced tube cleaners, cooling tower cleaning systems and coil cleaners that Goodway has to offer in Latin America, at this year’s AHR Expo Mexico. Thanks to everyone who stopped by booth 912 to witness what Goodway has to offer for easier, faster and more effective HVAC maintenance cleaning.

Stay tuned for 2018 AHR Expo Mexico in Mexico City, and for more information on Goodway’s innovative maintenance solutions, clic aqui.

 

 

Buying a Coil Cleaning System? Avoid these Five Mistakes

coil cleaning systemsSummer is coming, and with it a huge uptick in your facility’s HVAC usage. If your cooling systems aren’t properly serviced and maintained both your facility and your boss may be heating up fairly soon. Want to stay cool, optimize efficiency and still keep costs down? Avoid these five mistakes when buying an enterprise-grade coil cleaning system.

1 – Buying Same-Old System

As noted by AHCR News, coils have undergone significant evolution as companies look for ways to reduce refrigerant use without a loss of cooling power. Advances such as MicroGroove and micro channel technology, for example, leverage smaller-diameter copper tubes to carry less refrigerant at higher pressures. The result? Old cleaning tools may not have the ideal combination of pressure and flow to properly maintain new coils — for example, pump sprays may provide basic surface scrubbing but aren’t powerful enough to penetrate new coil beds. Bottom line? If you’re running new coils, you need new cleaning tools.

2 – Buying One-Size-Fits-All System

Another common mistake? Using generic tools rather than specific coil cleaning solutions. While “one size fits all” solutions may offer a quick clean they’re not designed for regularly scheduled, long-term cleaning. Look for industry-standard solutions — such as Goodway’s CoilPro line — which are tailored to meet specific cleaning needs.

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